Into the Book

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General Fiction


  1. Light of the Last is the third part of the Wars of the Realm trilogy, and a thrilling edge-of-the-seat finish to the series. Where the first book was about Drew Carter and his experience with enhanced physical capabilities and sight that enables him to see invisible alien invaders, and the second book followed the history of angels and demons, particularly the angel Validus assigned to watch Drew, the third book is where both worlds collide and the story continues from the perspectives of both Drew and Validus in their prospective worlds. Only one thing is for certain: reality will be shaken by this collision of heaven and earth, and their lives will never be the same. (more…)

  2. Silence is the most well-known novel by Japanese writer Shūsaku Endō. As a Catholic, Endō tells the story of Portuguese missionaries, on a mission to Japan during the time of persecution. Fathers Rodrigues and Garrpe have gone to Japan to find out if Japanese Christians still exist, to convert new believers, and to learn what has happened to Father Ferreira, a well-known priest who is said to have apostastized and has disappeared. Endō’s novel attacks questions of faith, trust, and manages to show a deep personal conflict in the life of Father Rodrigues. Read on for more (some spoilers): (more…)

  3. Anthony Marra’s first novel, A Constellation of Vital Phenomena, is so full of twists that it’s a difficult story to pin down. How many other novelists have written a novel that is about wartime Chechnya, jumps through twenty years of time, and features seven or eight main characters? Not too many that I have seen. Marra’s strange blend of omniscient storytelling and chronological looseness plays with a beautiful writing style and makes A Constellation of Vital Phenomena one of the best books I have read this year. (more…)

  4. I picked up At the Back of the North Wind at Half Price Books for 3 reasons: 1) It’s George MacDonald 2) Andrew Peterson’s house is named after this book (North Wind Manor), and 3) the book is simply gorgeous in the Everyman’s Classics edition. Those are reasons of varying solidity, but here are my reasons for why you also should pick up this book. Read on for more: (more…)

  5. Previously in the Wars of the Realm series, we met Drew; a young man who gained the ability to see angels and demons as the result of a lab explosion. However aside from the obvious battle between light and dark, we are never quite sure just what’s happening in this alternate world of the supernatural that Drew is an unlikely witness of. Well, all of that is about to change. (more…)

  6. Robert Heinlein’s Friday is a mixed bag of sci-fi tropes, missed opportunities, and casual vulgarity all sprinkled into a neat dystopian landscape filled with backstabbing, wars, and secrets. It’s a book that’s deeply conflicting: on the one hand, Heinlein has constructed a great, immersive world and asked some great questions of well-developed characters. On the other hand, there’s a lot that’s not worth reading and Heinlein often doesn’t answer his own questions. Friday is a circuitous book that winds around before finally resolving, and at the end of it all, I still can’t say if it was worth my time. Read on for more: (more…)

  7. What would you do if one day you woke up to a world full of alien invaders – but only you could see them? When Drew Carter agrees to help his nerdy friend reconstruct a science experiment for accelerating light, a plasma explosion threatens to leave him permanently blind. By some miracle, Drew regains his sight, but more than the return of his vision and his new superhuman abilities, he is horrified to discover that there is an all out war going on around him: one only he can see. Thus begins Drew’s quest to discover who these dark and light invaders are, and most importantly, what they are fighting for. If you’re looking for your next sci-fi read with a twist, or if you are a fan of Peretti, this one is for you! (more…)

  8. It had been five years since Sam Chase had visited his grandparents in Philadelphia. Since then, he had lived only in Baltimore. It was strange how so short a distance could highlight such a difference between temperaments in the north and south. In the south, folks respect a man’s right to search for his runaway property. In the north, folks (well, certain folks), give you the stink eye for doing so. Why, Sam’s own grandparents looked uncomfortable when Sam mentioned that his friend Wesley was in town looking for his father’s runaway slave. ‘Course, Sam knew his grandparents were Quakers, and staunch abolitionists at that, but the law clearly states that runaway slaves must be turned over to their masters. Sam wasn’t about to go against the law. So when Wesley and the local constable come looking for the runaway, Orlando, on Sam’s Grandpa’s farm, Sam eagerly shows them around. But, despite the constable’s incessant searching, there are no slaves to be found.

    Then, the next night, Sam runs into Orlando. Suddenly, Sam is faced with a choice: does he hide Orlando so he can get to Canada and be free, at the risk of breaking the law; or obey the law and hand Orlando back to his master. See? You’d never have to deal with these type of issues back in Baltimore.

    (more…)

  9. Trouble in the New Republic! Tensions are high as the government has split into two parties, arguing over the proper role of the Senate. One side (the Centrists) declare that the only way for true peace and unity is through a single, strong, centralized government. Others (the Populists) say that the only way to remain free, to avoid a return to the Empire, is through local government watching over its own community. These differences of opinion have been prevalent throughout history, but only now does it seem that people can no longer even communicate with those of differing ideals. If this internal bickering cannot be resolved, the New Republic may crumble without even a Death Star in sight. (more…)

  10. The Shadow of the Wind is Carlos Ruiz Zafon’s first adult novel, telling the story of Daniel, a young man tasked with finding out the terrible secrets behind the Spanish writer Julián Carax. In a similar vein to Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Umberto Eco, Zafón has produced an immense Gothic novel. Filled with suspense, horror, and surprising wonder, The Shadow of the Wind is a phenomenal piece of writing that fully immerses you in its world (more…)

ABOUT ItB REVIEWS

Into the Book was born out of a crazy idea of a blog that'd provide book reviews for teens. There aren't very many book review websites out there exposing awesome, high-quality Christian literature, and there are even fewer that target teenagers. Since 2009, we've been providing high-quality book reviews to the world through our blog. Into the Book has grown around reviews since then, but it remains our oldest project.

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