Into the Book

...

General Fiction


  1. What if you had the ability to change the past? What if you could travel back in time and stop a murder? Better yet, what if you could go back and stop all wars, murders, and disasters? What would you do with that kind of power? What should you do?

    (more…)

  2. There aren’t too many names in sci-fi bigger than Frank Herbert. Dune is his 1965 classic, a landmark in science fiction, and a ground-breaker for many novels to come. I may be fifty years late to the party, but even so, I enjoyed Herbert’s masterpiece, and found Dune a compelling story of humanity, loss, and prophecy that makes for the best sci-fi I’ve ever read. Read on for more: (more…)

  3. In an effort to chip away at my ever-growing “To Read” list, I sat down the other day and picked up The Lightning Thief, first book in the series of “Percy Jackson and the Olympians” by Rick Riordan. I wasn’t really sure what to expect. After all, elementary kids these days are crazy about Percy Jackson, which can either mean it’s a really great book, or a really lousy one. As I read through the book almost in one sitting (with a good night’s sleep about halfway through), I found that I was rather surprised by the book. It was a fun and engaging read, and I see why kids love it! But there were many parts that made me question whether The Lightning Thief is for everyone. (more…)

  4. The Paris Wife caught my eye several times at the bookstore before I took the plunge. Because it tells the story of Ernest Hemingway’s first marriage, I was worried that the novel would be knockoff Hemingway, stripped to the marrow but without any of the vitality that fills his classics. However, Paula McLain has written an excellent and engaging story; one that stands apart from Hemingway yet clearly is saturated in his writing. (more…)

  5. Before he became a father of the Christian Church, Augustine of Hippo loved a woman whose name has been lost to history. This is her story.

    This is the hook for Suzanne M. Wolfe’s latest book, The Confessions of X. No, this isn’t an erotic novel, despite the blood-red cover and giant ‘X’ in the title, but the subject matter is pretty far out of my comfort zone. I’m the type who’s more likely to read Augustine’s Confessions than a novel extrapolated from them. But how did Naiad’s story stack up? Read on for more: (more…)

  6. It’s hard to be a hustler. Animals these days aren’t as gullible as they used to be, and any fools around are quickly snapped up by other con-artists, of which there are far too many, if you ask me. Of course, that doesn’t stop Thimblerig from trying to find the fool among the many. And he’s good at it. So when Thimblerig has a nightmare about the coming apocalypse, he doesn’t chalk it up to bad figs. He sets a plan into motion to swindle as many believers as possible. Is it his fault that they think the vision comes from the almighty Unicorn to save them from the coming worldwide flood? Nope. All Thimblerig cares about is getting these suckers out into the middle of nowhere and then ditching them so he can start enjoying the good life. But, as his lies (and followers) grow, Thimblerig begins to wonder if his nightmare wasn’t something more after all. Unfortunately, before he can decide, he is faced with  a bigger problem: he has found himself in the middle of the Wild Dogs’ annual hunt, and believers are at the top of the menu. (more…)

  7. Graham Greene’s End of the Affair is difficult to digest, equal parts claustrophobic and imaginative. Set in wartime England, Greene’s novel is defined by wartime frankness that reminds me of Hemingway. At the same time, End of the Affair is intensely personal and emotional, conveying a tone that Hemingway never attempted. It’s a lesser-known piece of British literature that’s well worth some exploration. (more…)

  8. I will readily admit that when I first read That Hideous Strength I was not impressed. From 2010, past-Andrew wrote, “don’t even bother reading this one,” and “[That Hideous Strength] has very little plot connection with the first two books, and introduces totally different characters.” So I was tentative when I had finished Out of the Silent Planet and Perelandra, because that meant tackling That Hideous Strength once more. So did the book hold up under a re-read, or was I disappointed again? Read on for more: (more…)

  9. One dark and stormy night, after years of waiting for their missing scientist father to return, a stranger arrives on the doorstep of children Meg and Charles’ house. Dressed in funny old clothes and talking of things from another world, she sweeps Charles, Meg, and their friend Calvin into a dangerous adventure where they must face evil terrors whilst journeying through time and space to find their father. This is Wrinkle in Time, by Madeleine L’Engle. (more…)

  10. If the Space Trilogy is often forgotten, C.S. Lewis’ Perelandra may be the least known of the three stories. It can be difficult to slog through a book that’s essentially one long conversation, and the last time I read the Space Trilogy I just breezed through it. This time, however, I took it more slowly, and got a lot more out of it. Perelandra is a unique book that tackles deep theological questions about redemption: the story may take second place to the philosophy, but it’s worth the effort nonetheless. (more…)

ABOUT ItB REVIEWS

Into the Book was born out of a crazy idea of a blog that'd provide book reviews for teens. There aren't very many book review websites out there exposing awesome, high-quality Christian literature, and there are even fewer that target teenagers. Since 2009, we've been providing high-quality book reviews to the world through our blog. Into the Book has grown around reviews since then, but it remains our oldest project.

Follow my blog with Bloglovin