Into the Book

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General Non-Fiction


  1. It’s an admission of failure that the task: “Write: Review for Do More Better” sat in my Wunderlist account for almost a week, each day being pushed back to a later deadline. It was almost like the book was mocking me: Here I am, a book on productivity, and you can’t even find the time to review me. That’s because Do More Better is not a quick fix for productivity and busyness — it’s a system. And systems take time. Also, I am a dense human being and don’t learn lessons quickly. (more…)

  2. What it is, how to train it, and loving those who differ

    As the subtitle might imply, Andy Naselli and J.D. Crowley’s Conscience is devoted to answering three questions: 1) What is the conscience? 2) How do I live my life based on what my conscience tells me? and 3) What do I do with people who disagree? In only about a hundred pages, this book unloads a whole lot of truth. Read on for more: (more…)

  3. When I first read Pilgrim at Tinker Creek nearly five years ago, I was struck by how Annie Dillard wrote about the natural world with such a powerful voice, seeing creeks as if they held the secret to life. Her trademark has always been a wonder at the natural world that catches you up in “seeing with a sense of urgency, as if when you blink the entire elaborate picture will have vanished” (Read my review of Pilgrim at Tinker Creek). Teaching a Stone to Talk is a book that doesn’t change her core focuses, yet feels incredibly different from Pilgrim. Read on for more: (more…)

  4. C.S. Lewis never ceases to amaze. Not only did the man write a well-known fantasy series, a superb (and under-appreciated) sci-fi trilogy, and multiple theological fiction books (Till We Have Faces, The Great Divorce), he also wrote some fantastic, straight-up theology. The Four Loves is everything you would expect from a Lewis book: it’s personal and warm, direct and unassuming even as it tackles huge topics and arguments, and even entertaining as Lewis walks us through human and divine love in his own trademark style. There’s a lot to, erm, love about this book. (more…)

  5. When he was nine-years-old, Matthew Gallatin experienced God. He grew up in a Christian family, so he always knew of God. However, it was on that day that he truly experienced God. The rest of his life would be spent figuring out how to respond to it.

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  6. “This looks like a good book. Maybe I’ll just read it to get some good stuff out of it, and skip writing a review, because I have so much to do.”
    Oh wait.
    Busyness is so prevalent and so accepted that our standard response to “How are you?” is a simple, “Oh, you know, pretty busy.” If my day isn’t full, perfectly executing a ten-point todo list in stunning fashion, then maybe I’m doing something wrong! These are a few of the reasons why DeYoung has written his book Crazy Busy. It’s a (mercifully) short book about busyness, and DeYoung manages to pack a great deal into it. (more…)

  7. There are those who say that television rots our brains. Neil Postman would disagree. Rather than rotting our brains, he would say, it removes the necessity to use them. Now, this isn’t some old crank arguing about kids not playing outside anymore, or that the violence on TV will make us murderous. No, Postman argues that the way television presents information is erasing our need to think. Books, he writes, are the solution. As a writer on a book review website, just allow me to adjust my monocle and I’ll tell you why.

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  8. College is a tough time. I am faced with deciding what I want to do with my life, forced to spend lots of money and study a smorgasbord of difficult topics, and try to sift through what I really believe. I’m faced with so many questions: how do I find God’s will for my life? How can I be sure I have the right motivations? How can I hear God’s voice in my heart? Philosophy Professor Phillip Cary noticed many of his students wrestling with the same questions, and becoming ever anxious in search of answers. However, as he spoke with his students, Cary realized that the issue was not with the students, but with their bad theology. So Cary decided to write a book showing the good news to those anxious Christians.

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  9. A Book for Creators

    As an artist, I’m suffering from several issues that have targeted my ability to create, including anxiety, and a disgust for anything I write (words are my primary artistic medium). If you can relate to this, or are feeling bogged down by the grittiness of life as an artist, listen. If you’re an artist of any kind, or want to be one, there’s a good chance you will benefit from the insight expounded here.
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  10. Enjoying God in Everything

    There’s a pattern among Christians where many will abstain from “the pleasures of this world” as a sort of attempt at “holiness”. And other Christians choose to live hedonistically, enraptured by the pleasures our physical senses can deliver, sometimes feeling guilty for doing so, and asking forgiveness later. If you are in either of these camps, or gravitate to either of these extremes, I’ve got a book recommendation for you. (more…)