Into the Book

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Apologetics/Theology


  1. What it is, how to train it, and loving those who differ

    As the subtitle might imply, Andy Naselli and J.D. Crowley’s Conscience is devoted to answering three questions: 1) What is the conscience? 2) How do I live my life based on what my conscience tells me? and 3) What do I do with people who disagree? In only about a hundred pages, this book unloads a whole lot of truth. Read on for more: (more…)

  2. “The medium is the message” –Marshall McLuhan.

    As a communication theorist, McLuhan believed that the presentation of an idea formed the idea as much as the content of the idea itself. Therefore, transferring an idea from written to verbal form does not just modify its presentation, but the very idea itself. Mennonite Pastor Shane Hipps takes this concept and applies it to the Church. Our culture has transformed from a typographical culture to a digital one. How are Christians to respond without compromising Christianity?

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  3. C.S. Lewis never ceases to amaze. Not only did the man write a well-known fantasy series, a superb (and under-appreciated) sci-fi trilogy, and multiple theological fiction books (Till We Have Faces, The Great Divorce), he also wrote some fantastic, straight-up theology. The Four Loves is everything you would expect from a Lewis book: it’s personal and warm, direct and unassuming even as it tackles huge topics and arguments, and even entertaining as Lewis walks us through human and divine love in his own trademark style. There’s a lot to, erm, love about this book. (more…)

  4. When he was nine-years-old, Matthew Gallatin experienced God. He grew up in a Christian family, so he always knew of God. However, it was on that day that he truly experienced God. The rest of his life would be spent figuring out how to respond to it.

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  5. How do I review someone’s diary? What right do I have to judge a diary based on story structure? How can I critique the lack of flow or plot? A diary is not meant to fit within an outwardly logical structure, for it is meant for the writer alone. It reminds me of what the main character states in Dostoevsky’s Notes from the Underground: “I can ramble, because this is not meant for someone to read, it is meant for me.” While Augustine is meaning for others to read this, it is mostly for himself and for God. Augustine is writing out his prayers, his musings, his longings, and his confessions. As such, the ideas ramble and bleed together, some following to a logical conclusion and others being only touched upon. Yet, despite this occasional lack of coherence, Confessions should not be criticized, it should be applauded. Augustine, unlike Dostoevsky’s character, is a genius, and this is the story of his life.

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  6. College is a tough time. I am faced with deciding what I want to do with my life, forced to spend lots of money and study a smorgasbord of difficult topics, and try to sift through what I really believe. I’m faced with so many questions: how do I find God’s will for my life? How can I be sure I have the right motivations? How can I hear God’s voice in my heart? Philosophy Professor Phillip Cary noticed many of his students wrestling with the same questions, and becoming ever anxious in search of answers. However, as he spoke with his students, Cary realized that the issue was not with the students, but with their bad theology. So Cary decided to write a book showing the good news to those anxious Christians.

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  7. The Christian church in the United States today faces a great challenge. No, I’m not talking about the attack on marriage or the “homosexual threat.” Instead, Christians are finally facing the consequences of lukewarm, cultural Christianity. Churches stand at a crossroads: either we can embrace the culture and stay in their favor, or we can seek to humbly stand for what we believe the Bible teaches, and face a decisive fall from their favor. Al Mohler’s latest book, We Cannot be Silent, presents a bold call as the culture shifts around us: how to speak truth to a culture redefining sex, marriage, and the very meaning of right and wrong. (more…)

  8. The Grace of God for the People of God

    How often do you think about the triune nature of God? Have you ever considered how the doctrine of the Trinity should impact you, as a Christian? Many haven’t, and all would benefit from meditating on the rich truths within this doctrine. Experiencing the Trinity, by Joe Thorn isn’t about fully understanding the nature of the Trinity, the focus is on taking in individual truths and responding to them, digesting them with the hope that your focus would be filled by our great triune God.

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  9. There is a common philosophical question: “If a tree falls in the forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?” Walton presents a similar philosophical quandary: “If a computer rests in the forest but is never used, is it really a computer?” To put it another way: when does that computer actually come into being? Is it when all the parts are put into place? Or is it when the computer is actually put to use? Walton uses the example of a business. Is the business created when it has the building in place or when it has a sales license? In essence, should creation be understood as functional or material?

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  10. When teaching difficult, controversial subjects, there are two ways to present an issue. The first way is to teach the Teacher’s opinion, pointing out the faults of the other sides while revealing the strengths of the Teacher’s view. The other way is to present the shines and dents in all sides, then allow the students to decide for themselves. When talking about the Bible, the latter approach is a difficult one to take. Yet, that is how Nichols and Brandt decided to present their book on the Bible. (more…)

ABOUT ItB REVIEWS

Into the Book was born out of a crazy idea of a blog that'd provide book reviews for teens. There aren't very many book review websites out there exposing awesome, high-quality Christian literature, and there are even fewer that target teenagers. Since 2009, we've been providing high-quality book reviews to the world through our blog. Into the Book has grown around reviews since then, but it remains our oldest project.

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