Into the Book

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Apologetics/Theology


  1. I grew up in a church with very little liturgy. As a result, the words “Apostle’s Creed” meant very little to me until recently. Of course, the term ‘creed’ was familiar, I had taken enough church history for it to ring a bell, but when it came to the actual content of the creeds I was clueless. Therefore, when I was required to read Affirming the Apostle’s Creed for a college class, I was both excited and a little wary. I wasn’t sure what I was about to encounter. I was afraid, due to my lack of previous knowledge, most of the book was going to go far over my head. Thankfully, that fear was unfounded. (more…)

  2. J.I. Packer is no light-weight. His book, A Quest for Godliness, is a treasure of historical study and theological truth. But, like most treasure, it’s buried deeply, and asks great determination from the seeker. For those who search, Packer’s book is both a valuable reference and an unavoidable challenge to today’s evangelical church. It is a piercing look at the Puritans, always with an eye towards the church of today, and what we have to learn.

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  3. Carlos Darby introduces his new book The One as a new experience that merges storytelling with new formats to tell the story of Jesus to a new generation. “The One uses The Voice Bible translation alongside powerful, full-color images to maximize the long-term impact for the reader, creating a dynamic way to engage with and experience the scriptures.” If you know me at all, you’ll know that I found that description simultaneously very intriguing but also very terrifying. After all, there are more ways to screw up the story of the gospel with a ‘new format’ than there are to improve it. While I’m all for innovative storytelling methods, I almost always come to the conclusion that such a story is not worth tampering with. But surprisingly, I found The One to be a whole lot better than I expected.

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  4. I received this book almost exactly a year ago as suggested summer reading. Now I’ve read it — only a year late — no biggie right? Most good books inspire you to do something in a burst of impassioned energy that often fades. A great book, like Life Together burns in you and changes you little by little. Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s book really is a classic, worth reading and re-reading.

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  5. A Beautiful Defeat, by Kevin Malarkey, is one of the latest books on “Christian living” to come out of Thomas Nelson books. With the subtitle “find true freedom and purpose in total surrender to God,” Malarkey’s book is refreshingly clear and God-focused. In fact, it totally surprised me. (more…)

  6. In Beyond the Shadowlands, Wayne Martindale compiles all of C.S. Lewis’ writing on heaven and hell into one condensed, fantastic book. Though Martindale’s own voice shines through, the book is mainly a prism that draws a rainbow of C.S. Lewis’ writing together into a single beam of brilliant light. Both Lewis’ rainbow and Martindale’s prism are delightful on their own, but together I can’t help but recommend this book.

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  7. Do you know Jesus? I mean, do you really know him? Could you tell me what kind of person he was? What was his personality? If I asked you to describe Jesus to me like he was your best friend, could you do it? I know I couldn’t. Honestly, I don’t know Jesus as well as I often say I do. Neither do most people in the church. Jesus was a compelling, strong, “brilliant, untamed, tender, creative, slippery, irreducible, paradoxically humble” man, willing to leave heavenly glory and step into time, space, and the human body for the purpose of saving the world from sin. If you don’t know that Jesus, I strongly recommend you read Philip Yancey’s The Jesus I Never Knew.

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  8. “What is Dr. Geisler warning the Christian community about in his book Chosen But Free? A new cult? Secularism? False prophesy scenarios? No. Dr. Geisler is sounding the alarm about a system of beliefs commonly called “Calvinism”. He insists this belief is “theologically inconsistent, philosophically insufficient, and morally repugnant.” (From the back cover) It is with that backdrop, comes a reply by one of the most well known Reformed Apologists in the field today, Dr. James White, as he sets out to paint a clear and pointed picture of what Calvinism actually is through logical process, exegetical precision and bold refutation of Dr. Geisler’s unfair and unfounded assertions. This is not a book for everybody’s tastes, but everybody should read it—especially those in disagreement or question of the Reformed system of faith.
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  9. This book is like a fairy tale, kind of: everything turns out right in the end. Mostly. It’s an apt description, for this book attempts to describe the real life fairy tale that we are all living: The Romance of Religion: fighting for goodness, truth, and beauty. Even if fairy tales aren’t your cup of tea, everyone wants goodness, truth, and beauty — so is it worth fighting for? Does this book even offer a path to finding those things?

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  10. I have long been a believer in the power of children’s literature. Stories, though fictitious, always contain real expressions of truth. And children’s literature is especially so, because this truth must be broken down into its individual parts, so that even the youngest and freshest of minds may understand it. In God of the Fairy Tale, author Jim Ware demonstrates certain truths of Christianity as revealed in popular children’s fairy tales.

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ABOUT ItB REVIEWS

Into the Book was born out of a crazy idea of a blog that'd provide book reviews for teens. There aren't very many book review websites out there exposing awesome, high-quality Christian literature, and there are even fewer that target teenagers. Since 2009, we've been providing high-quality book reviews to the world through our blog. Into the Book has grown around reviews since then, but it remains our oldest project.

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