Into the Book

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Review


  1. The Shadow of the Wind is Carlos Ruiz Zafon’s first adult novel, telling the story of Daniel, a young man tasked with finding out the terrible secrets behind the Spanish writer Julián Carax. In a similar vein to Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Umberto Eco, Zafón has produced an immense Gothic novel. Filled with suspense, horror, and surprising wonder, The Shadow of the Wind is a phenomenal piece of writing that fully immerses you in its world (more…)

  2. There aren’t too many names in sci-fi bigger than Frank Herbert. Dune is his 1965 classic, a landmark in science fiction, and a ground-breaker for many novels to come. I may be fifty years late to the party, but even so, I enjoyed Herbert’s masterpiece, and found Dune a compelling story of humanity, loss, and prophecy that makes for the best sci-fi I’ve ever read. Read on for more: (more…)

  3. There are those who say that television rots our brains. Neil Postman would disagree. Rather than rotting our brains, he would say, it removes the necessity to use them. Now, this isn’t some old crank arguing about kids not playing outside anymore, or that the violence on TV will make us murderous. No, Postman argues that the way television presents information is erasing our need to think. Books, he writes, are the solution. As a writer on a book review website, just allow me to adjust my monocle and I’ll tell you why.

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  4. In an effort to chip away at my ever-growing “To Read” list, I sat down the other day and picked up The Lightning Thief, first book in the series of “Percy Jackson and the Olympians” by Rick Riordan. I wasn’t really sure what to expect. After all, elementary kids these days are crazy about Percy Jackson, which can either mean it’s a really great book, or a really lousy one. As I read through the book almost in one sitting (with a good night’s sleep about halfway through), I found that I was rather surprised by the book. It was a fun and engaging read, and I see why kids love it! But there were many parts that made me question whether The Lightning Thief is for everyone. (more…)

  5. College is a tough time. I am faced with deciding what I want to do with my life, forced to spend lots of money and study a smorgasbord of difficult topics, and try to sift through what I really believe. I’m faced with so many questions: how do I find God’s will for my life? How can I be sure I have the right motivations? How can I hear God’s voice in my heart? Philosophy Professor Phillip Cary noticed many of his students wrestling with the same questions, and becoming ever anxious in search of answers. However, as he spoke with his students, Cary realized that the issue was not with the students, but with their bad theology. So Cary decided to write a book showing the good news to those anxious Christians.

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  6. The Paris Wife caught my eye several times at the bookstore before I took the plunge. Because it tells the story of Ernest Hemingway’s first marriage, I was worried that the novel would be knockoff Hemingway, stripped to the marrow but without any of the vitality that fills his classics. However, Paula McLain has written an excellent and engaging story; one that stands apart from Hemingway yet clearly is saturated in his writing. (more…)

  7. Before he became a father of the Christian Church, Augustine of Hippo loved a woman whose name has been lost to history. This is her story.

    This is the hook for Suzanne M. Wolfe’s latest book, The Confessions of X. No, this isn’t an erotic novel, despite the blood-red cover and giant ‘X’ in the title, but the subject matter is pretty far out of my comfort zone. I’m the type who’s more likely to read Augustine’s Confessions than a novel extrapolated from them. But how did Naiad’s story stack up? Read on for more: (more…)

  8. A Book for Creators

    As an artist, I’m suffering from several issues that have targeted my ability to create, including anxiety, and a disgust for anything I write (words are my primary artistic medium). If you can relate to this, or are feeling bogged down by the grittiness of life as an artist, listen. If you’re an artist of any kind, or want to be one, there’s a good chance you will benefit from the insight expounded here.
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  9. It’s hard to be a hustler. Animals these days aren’t as gullible as they used to be, and any fools around are quickly snapped up by other con-artists, of which there are far too many, if you ask me. Of course, that doesn’t stop Thimblerig from trying to find the fool among the many. And he’s good at it. So when Thimblerig has a nightmare about the coming apocalypse, he doesn’t chalk it up to bad figs. He sets a plan into motion to swindle as many believers as possible. Is it his fault that they think the vision comes from the almighty Unicorn to save them from the coming worldwide flood? Nope. All Thimblerig cares about is getting these suckers out into the middle of nowhere and then ditching them so he can start enjoying the good life. But, as his lies (and followers) grow, Thimblerig begins to wonder if his nightmare wasn’t something more after all. Unfortunately, before he can decide, he is faced with  a bigger problem: he has found himself in the middle of the Wild Dogs’ annual hunt, and believers are at the top of the menu. (more…)

  10. The Thomas Nelson “Apply the Word” study bible is an excellent little resource and Bible. Using the word-for-word New King James version, this book packs a big punch. Sidebars and extra study resources augment the original text. (more…)