Into the Book

...

Recent Reviews

  1. The Man Who Laughs by Victor Hugo

    Gwynplaine is not your normal guy. Sure, he was a child slave who was abandoned by his owners when he was yet young. Sure, he adopted a dying infant when he had no family of his own. Sure, he now lives with a misanthrope playwright who would prefer to talk to his wolf than another human. That’s a little out of the ordinary. Still, what is really different, what everyone notices about him, is his face: a cruel, lasting trick of his owners, setting his face into an eternal laugh. Of course, his face sets a stark contrast with his life. He tries to make the best of it, but it’s not easy. The infant he adopted, lovingly named Dea, is now blind. The three of them (Gwynplaine, Dea, and the playwright, Ursus) barely scrape by on the cash they bring in from Ursus’ plays. Unfortunately, after suffering through a miserable life for twenty some years, Gwynplaine is facing an even more difficult issue: one of the heart. For all of his life, he has been in love with Dia. Now, against all odds, Gwynplaine discovers he is the son of a Lord. Rightful husband of beautiful Duchess Josiana (who also loves him), he is given the chance to use his newfound power to fight for the poor. Yet, to do all of that, he must give up Dea. A chance to do what is right, or a chance for love. The choice is no laughing matter.

    Continue reading »

  2. 425027_1_ftc

    What would you do if one day you woke up to a world full of alien invaders – but only you could see them? When Drew Carter agrees to help his nerdy friend reconstruct a science experiment for accelerating light, a plasma explosion threatens to leave him permanently blind. By some miracle, Drew regains his sight, but more than the return of his vision and his new superhuman abilities, he is horrified to discover that there is an all out war going on around him: one only he can see. Thus begins Drew’s quest to discover who these dark and light invaders are, and most importantly, what they are fighting for. If you’re looking for your next sci-fi read with a twist, or if you are a fan of Peretti, this one is for you! Continue reading »

  3. Looking for Orlando by Frances Browin

    It had been five years since Sam Chase had visited his grandparents in Philadelphia. Since then, he had lived only in Baltimore. It was strange how so short a distance could highlight such a difference between temperaments in the north and south. In the south, folks respect a man’s right to search for his runaway property. In the north, folks (well, certain folks), give you the stink eye for doing so. Why, Sam’s own grandparents looked uncomfortable when Sam mentioned that his friend Wesley was in town looking for his father’s runaway slave. ‘Course, Sam knew his grandparents were Quakers, and staunch abolitionists at that, but the law clearly states that runaway slaves must be turned over to their masters. Sam wasn’t about to go against the law. So when Wesley and the local constable come looking for the runaway, Orlando, on Sam’s Grandpa’s farm, Sam eagerly shows them around. But, despite the constable’s incessant searching, there are no slaves to be found.

    Then, the next night, Sam runs into Orlando. Suddenly, Sam is faced with a choice: does he hide Orlando so he can get to Canada and be free, at the risk of breaking the law; or obey the law and hand Orlando back to his master. See? You’d never have to deal with these type of issues back in Baltimore.

    Continue reading »

  4. What’s a writing life with no writing?

    What do you do when your writing life doesn’t include much writing? It’s a guarantee that at some point you’ll hit a wall with your story, or you’ll get busy at work, or you’ll lose the initial spark that inspired you, or you’ll pick up a new hobby and writing will get pushed to the side. What’s a writer to do in a time when their own writing is dormant?

    Continue reading »

  5. Star-Wars-Bloodline-by-Claudia-Gray-via-Del-Rey

    Trouble in the New Republic! Tensions are high as the government has split into two parties, arguing over the proper role of the Senate. One side (the Centrists) declare that the only way for true peace and unity is through a single, strong, centralized government. Others (the Populists) say that the only way to remain free, to avoid a return to the Empire, is through local government watching over its own community. These differences of opinion have been prevalent throughout history, but only now does it seem that people can no longer even communicate with those of differing ideals. If this internal bickering cannot be resolved, the New Republic may crumble without even a Death Star in sight. Continue reading »

  6. Today we welcome Elizabeth Kirkwood, Andrew Joyce, and Caleb Joyce to Tools of the Trade to talk about some of their favourite tools of writing (aside from a computer), and why they remain such a standout. So! Onto the questions: Continue reading »

  7. Confessions by St Augustine

    How do I review someone’s diary? What right do I have to judge a diary based on story structure? How can I critique the lack of flow or plot? A diary is not meant to fit within an outwardly logical structure, for it is meant for the writer alone. It reminds me of what the main character states in Dostoevsky’s Notes from the Underground: “I can ramble, because this is not meant for someone to read, it is meant for me.” While Augustine is meaning for others to read this, it is mostly for himself and for God. Augustine is writing out his prayers, his musings, his longings, and his confessions. As such, the ideas ramble and bleed together, some following to a logical conclusion and others being only touched upon. Yet, despite this occasional lack of coherence, Confessions should not be criticized, it should be applauded. Augustine, unlike Dostoevsky’s character, is a genius, and this is the story of his life.

    Continue reading »

  8. shadow-of-the-wind-zafon

    The Shadow of the Wind is Carlos Ruiz Zafon’s first adult novel, telling the story of Daniel, a young man tasked with finding out the terrible secrets behind the Spanish writer Julián Carax. In a similar vein to Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Umberto Eco, Zafón has produced an immense Gothic novel. Filled with suspense, horror, and surprising wonder, The Shadow of the Wind is a phenomenal piece of writing that fully immerses you in its world Continue reading »

  9. 11-22-63 by Stephen King

    What if you had the ability to change the past? What if you could travel back in time and stop a murder? Better yet, what if you could go back and stop all wars, murders, and disasters? What would you do with that kind of power? What should you do?

    Continue reading »

  10. Last week we talked about keeping a deep and varied reading list as a great way to get inspiration for a story. Today, we’re going to drill into a specific type of inspiration: the ancient classics. Suzanne Collins is great, but have you read your Aristophanes lately? Continue reading »

ABOUT ItB REVIEWS

Into the Book was born out of a crazy idea of a blog that'd provide book reviews for teens. There aren't very many book review websites out there exposing awesome, high-quality Christian literature, and there are even fewer that target teenagers. Since 2009, we've been providing high-quality book reviews to the world through our blog. Into the Book has grown around reviews since then, but it remains our oldest project.

Follow my blog with Bloglovin